Science Moab is a weekly half-hour program exploring current research going on within the Colorado Plateau and beyond. The show includes interviews with scientists about the fascinating research they are conducting in our area. Host and producer Kristina Young explores basic ideas behind various scientific topics, the kinds of research that scientists do to answer their questions, and how current research can help us understand our changing world. Science topics span ecology, geology, chemistry, archaeology, hydrology, and any other -ology that might come our way. Kristina also explores the human side of science by asking researchers why they chose to pursue science careers and what they most enjoy about the work they do.

Join us every Friday at 11:30 am for Science Moab or listen later on SoundCloud, iTunes, & Stitcher

You can follow Science Moab on instagram and facebook to stay up-to-date with the science in Moab. Funding is provided in part by the BYU Charles Redd Center for Western Studies

Science Moab

A fascinating look at the relationships between pollinators and plants, how they evolved to work together, the types of pollinators we have on the Colorado Plateau, and what the future holds for pollinators with Molly McCormick.
Kristina Young
February 4, 2019
Science Moab

The Colorado Plateau holds an incredible amount of native plant diversity, however past and current land use practices and future climate change threaten the diversity and abundance of our native plant species. Here, with Dr. Daniel Winkler, we explore how land management programs and non-profit partners are using programs like Seeds of Success and the Colorado Plateau Native Plant Program to collect native seeds and make them available for research and restoration.
Kristina Young
February 4, 2019
Science Moab

What were mammals like when dinosaurs roamed the earth? We explore the fascinating world of mammals living at the time of dinosaurs with Dr. Brian Davis. We learn about what they ate, who ate them, and how these small creatures evolved to become the mammals we see today.
Kristina Young
February 4, 2019
Science Moab

Here we talk about a field called geomorphology with Christopher Ely. We explore Amazonian headwater streams in the Andes Mountains of southern Ecuador, and how the tools used to studying these high elevation streams can be applied to studying rivers and streams around the world and here on the Colorado Plateau.
Kristina Young
February 4, 2019
Science Moab

The desert both breathes out and pulls in carbon to and from the atmosphere. Here we talk with Dr. Anthony Darrouzet-Nardi about that process by exploring a field called biogeochemistry. We hear about the different kinds of carbon that exists in ecosystems, and how it is transformed and moved through the fascinating and dynamic carbon cycle.
Kristina Young
February 4, 2019
Science Moab

Desertified and degraded are words often used when talking about drylands. But what do these words actually mean? And how do they shape the ways we think about managing and restoring drylands? Here with talk with Dr. Brandon Bestelmeyer, who has studied drylands both in the Southwest, and around the world. We explore what kinds of transitions drylands have undergone, and how they will continue to change into the future.
Kristina Young
February 4, 2019

 

Host Kristina Young moved to the Southwest in 2010, and has spent her time studying the desert ever since. She worked for the USGS Southwest Biological Science Center in Moab for four years, and received her Masters of Science degree from Northern Arizona University, where she was a Wyss Scholar for Conservation of the American West.

As a strong believer in the importance of science communication, Kristina loves talking about and exploring all things science. Have questions or want to know more? Email Kristina at kristinaey@gmail.com or find her on twitter @arid_ecology

 

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This